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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 273 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the oceans. some forms of life flourish in this salty environment. but humans require an abundant supply of freshwater. less than 1% of all the earth's water is readily available for human consumption. in the semi-arid desert plains of the southwest united states, where rainfall averages just 2 1/2 centimeters per month, tom maddock studies this scarce resource. dr. maddock: the real problem that we have is that with increasing populations and shortages of water, we are becoming very vulnerable. in the southwest, there's a very unique vulnerability here, simply because where do we get the water if there is no water? narrator: across the country in northern florida, the quantity of water isn't an issue. rainfall averages an abundant 1 1/4 meters each year. wendy graham and her colleagues evaluate and model the impacts of industrial and agricultural land use threatening the world's largest collection of freshwater springs. dr. graham: right now, the biggest question is how far we can stress the system and not push it past the point of no return. narrator: both researchers are working towar
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
built environment." one key issue: how to protect the new york subway system which experienced the worst damage in it's 108 year history. many stations remain submerged under several feet of water even as limited operations are expected to resume tomorrow. but infrastructure renovations are not always a clear fix. mayor michael bloomberg, who has taken a number of steps to make new york a greener city, has not yet proposed a major infrastructure change that might deal with rising water levels, for example. but he warned again today that citizens and policymakers need to take climate change predictions seriously. >> it's not the sort of thing that you can ever say for sure but the consequences of making a mistake in either direction are pretty severe and i think what we have to do is learn from this and protect our infrastructure to the extent possible. the bottom line is we've lost some people, we have to make sure we help their families and pray for them. we have to at the same time ensure that we go forward here and keep the city going. >> suarez: part of the growing problem: new york'
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the time y
strength, which is new york's coastal environment, that's what made new york new york, right? new york harbor, hudson river, to the erie canal, and you were out west. that was new york. what made manhattan manhattan was the underground infrastructure. that engineering marvel. once you now say, well, that can flood, and you can't even find a way to pump out the water, you take the greatest asset and you make it a liability. and it's a frightening premise to deal with, you know? i think that's one of the reasons why denial is so much easier. because once you say, yes, extreme weather is here to say, we have to redesign this environment environment, well that's a big undertaking and it's threatening to many. i think that's where we are. >> can new york city escape the sort of national flurosis? it's a fight on the national level. out of necessity, can new york state and new york city lead on this issue because we have to, even if the rest of the country isn't ready to arrive at any consensus and make any big national decisions? >> we're going to try. you know, what we practice in new york
and are interested in farm and families and keeping them together. if you're interested in the environment and interested in labelling food, then your values are, you know, if you lie somewhere in there you want a place to go where you can check to see if your elected representatives are voting your values. >> and the other thing you brought up, i read it in your report, do you think that the government should subsidize, how big a difference do you think it would make in terms of what people pay? that is the question they have. >> right, it would definitely drive the prices down. if you want to feed your family organic, it is very expensive. definitely out of the reach of low income people. but yet, a lot of us feel that nutritional foods should be easy and affordable to obtain. so if you're taking 20 billion a year and using it to subsidize corn, wheat and soy, that could cheap those things feet. if you take the subsidize, and more people could afford them. it just makes good food policy, i don't think people connect what they're eating, prices at the supermarket or at a farmer's market,
on energy and the environment at the american enterprise institute, a conservative think tank. gentlemen, we heard mayor bloomberg, governor cuomo sort of wrestling outloud with making these choices. knowing what e know does philadelphia, does boston, does new york have to use a changed municipal math to run its daily affairs because of threats of these kinds of things? joe kromm? >> well, i think as governor cuomo said, it'sro a new normal but we have old infrastructure. i think if f you listen to client scientists -- if we had listened to climate sientists who worned, no could flood like this, that storm surges were going to increase as the sea levels rose because of gobel warming and because of more intense storms we might have prevented it. now i think we need to listen to climate scientists who are warning that sea levels could rise, two feet-- as you heard-- by the middle of the century but three, four, five and six feet by the end of the century. so our choices are twofold. we should reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we're on the low end of future warming estimates and secondly we've
this government create an environment for small business. i come from a long line of small business. i owned a small thises and ran a small loss form -- long form for many years. business acumen does not translate into good government. what we need in maine and in america is to invest in education, infrastructure, to reform our taxes, to reduce our spending, and to get this economy on track so the government can provide an environment for small businesses to grow and prosper and to help families get through this economy. the disparity in income is the biggest problem. what might two major opponents offer is more of the same. >> we have some business owners. does anyone want to answer? >> i am not a small business owner. i never said i was. i am self-employed. i am a free-lance writer. if you are a political pundits like i am, if you run for senate, you are no longer a political pundit. not only have i not created a job, but i cost myself a job by running for office. on that question, i do not have a good record. >> i think it is sad the recently we have looked at government services as being
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
approval rating -- of an approval rating in this environment getting thrown out, getting rejected. caller: he covers politics for the "philadelphia inquirer." the poll out this morning -- results available online. thank you for being with us. let's give back your phone calls. mike joins us from pennsylvania, democrat line. good morning. caller: good morning. my question is, with the controversy around the voter i.d. issue, the republican legislature suppressing turnout, do you think this will in any way suppress turnout and, if so, will it be enough to effect the margins in any way? thanks. host: thanks for the call. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that requires pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id is. if you did not have one in the meantime, the state would provide you with one. you had to go through certain procedures to get a photo id. more recently, in the last few weeks, a state judge simply set aside that particular provision of the law so that pennsylvanian is on november 6 -- you'll be asked to show one of those six forms of id. if you d
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. ♪ [applause] neil: whooping it up there tonight and why he has targeted florida, another one of the most when states. in most of the polls he is leading, not all of them. that's what makes him such a dicey guy, but he is selling the red meat to a group of very loyal partisans, but he does have a good shot at winning estate. ohio is looking more problematic certainly michigan. florida, they always talk about you have to win ohio, but an order to jump-start that you have to win florida. certainly more confidence in the sunshine state than at present they are in any other state. monitor what he's saying about the economy. help s
. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks, as a new domain of war. and yet, we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. and so what we're trying to do in the zero day series is to take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platoon i can idea is that -- p mr. speaker atonic idea is everybody from my mom and dad and to people in the congress, everybody can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities, monday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> president obama went to the headquarters of the federal emergency management agency today to get an update on preparations for hurricane sandy. the national response coordination center in washington is where fema is managing the deployment of federal resources to states along the east coast, ahead of the storm. >> thank you. >> keep it up. thank you. >> great job. >> >> across the country are conc
king helicopters are used to build awareness of maritime environment. her helicopters are equipped with variable depth tone, radar for surface search and all weather conditions and has capabilities as such. the ch1 alpha aircraft is able to detect submarines and can vary two mark six submarine missiles. thank you, ladies and gentlemen, her majesty's algonquin. >> next in line, is her majesty's canadian ship, edmond. she was one of royal canadian's navy's 12 kingston's classics. built in 1985 as part of the maritime project. he was built with sophisticated warfare equipment. she has proven herself extending far beyond her title. her main elements include 40 millimeter gun, and two, 50 caliber man guns. edmonton is a sophisticated weapon in canada an arsenal. he's has a draft of only 11 feet. she has a displacement of 1,000 tons. edmonton was laid down on 8 august, 1995 by halifax unlimited in halifax, nova scotia and commissioned in the canadian forces on 21 june, 1987 and then asigned to maritime forces pacific based in british columbia. since that time, she has participated in num
it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. ashink, let's use this area an example that we can hold up around the rest of the country. >> rebuttal from con
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
for over 400 years. it is a very urban environment. it is not like some of the areas for long island and recent histories with houses way out onto beach territory. some of them situated. it is not the kind of island environment where you think of yourselves as having ocean on the sides and i was born and raised here on staten island and so were my mom and dad. staten island has had a feeling of what you had said. the complete opposite. there was never a threat. people never thought that there would be problems with the tides. here on staten island. and i think that is what caught a lot of people off guard here on staten island was that we never thought something like this could happen. we do have many beautiful houses and beautiful community that is are on the coast lines of our island. and we never thought there would be a problem like this. and i think that caught a lot of people off guard. >> michael cusik thank you very much for joining us tonight. tomorrow night, msnbc will host a concert and telethon to raise money for the american red cross relief efforts. you can see it right
way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. -- the reliance on foreign fuel. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. i think, let's use this area as an example that we can hold up around the rest
rags. more blow back earlier but it's a news environment where they feel they can air whatever they want, people will be talk about sandy, ar by trait it after the election. >> this is the obama campaign's response to that ad. take a look at it. >> and now, after romney's false claim of jeep outsourcing to china, chrysler itself has refuted romney's lie. the truth, jeep is adding jobs in ohio. >> well, i mean, so do you have that response. you have -- i just think there are auto workers in ohio that know that their factory doors have remained open because of the choice the president made when he first took office. >> absolutely. i spent time recently in columbus which interestingly is a very bipartisan town, be democratic mayor, a bunch of republican city fathers spent money on infrastructure, supported the auto industry, they have a delegation to china to do deals like this one, to look for ways factory workers in columbus can sell to chinese. i think american workers are savvier about globalization and the opportunity it presents. >> that's not what the obama campaign thinks.
. >> they have not disclosed the dangers to the environment and to the public of this activity before putting these lands up for sale. >> reporter: kas >> reporter: casey with the center for biological diversity filed a 60-day intent to sue. >> these beautiful areas that people use for getting out in nature are at great risk of being transformed overnight from the shale oil rush. >> reporter: jacobson says he's not too wared about the fracking. >> they know they'll get sued if they screw up somebody's well water or surface water. >> reporter: but just in case, he has a backup plan. when the auction comes up, he says he might just bid on his own mineral rights and buy them back. allen martin, cbs 5. >>> a follow-up to a story we brought you earlier this week. a caltrans worker has resigned amid allegations that some trucks were using trucks rented by the agency for personal use. >> why are you buying wine on state time, sir? sir, this car right here, this is rented by caltrans. you're using it as your personal car. you take it home every day. it's taxpayer money that goes toward representing
. small businesses are taxed at 35%. that is not sustainable in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a -- these problems create an impediment to congress meant -- an impediment to commerce. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural in
at the cia outpost it the security environment degraded suddenly. there was an agreement to formal weekly meet to go discuss the security environment. in the longer term we believe formal location with the annex will greatly improve our security situation. moving the consulate operations to the ci operations might not have ultimately saved the lives of the four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. the annex came under fire in the second wave of attacks and it former navy seals died defending their colleagues there. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> early voting set to wrap up tomorrow notice crucial battleground state of florida." but the lines are so long some are asking for an extension. the florida league of women's votes say the wait could discourage people from voting at all. the florida's governor said he's not budging. phil is in florida are. it is my understanding the governor is also calling for an extension? >> the early voting line here in miami, dade county, just to showcase one location, has been three and a half hours long all day long today. the line still sits
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new completely re-imagined 2013 chevrolet malibu. sleek new styling... sophisticated dual cockpit design, and sport sculpted seats. available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu. ♪ refined comfort to get you in a malibu state of mind no matter what state you live in. ♪ >>> we're awaiting president obama in a swing state of ohio. meantime, in another swing state, that of virginia, bill clinton campaigning on behalf of the president. let's listen in at chesapeake, virginia, at indiana river high school. [ applause ] >> i don't know about you, but i'd rather you save the gasoline and export the oil if that's what we need to do. and that's why governor romney is having such a hard time breaking through in ohio. so what did he do? he ran -- he put -- he put a bogus ad on saying that for president had allowed jeep to move jobs to china. then he said the president had allowed chrysler, which owns jeep, to move jobs to ch
representing how man must spend trillions of dollars in an environment where we don't have trillions of dollars to do much of anything. why is it always the case? to what end? >> well, you know, global warming has been the most successful green scam and it is a tremendous tool of the laughter at the left is just now starting to embrace global warming as a means towards government control of everything of the economy and socialism. you know, when you tell people that capitalism and the free market is destroying the environment, people get scared. they are willing to turn over control of their lives and the economy to the central planners and that is the goal. neil: so when you look at it, you are trying to debunk what has been popular, mainstream media nonsense. do you look at what has been happening recycle is -- i mean, the fame meteorologist joe, we go through these periods of intense weather patterns and we misinterpret them in the middle of them. it has little to do with intense weather patterns. when people say that they have signs that show that humans are harming the climate, i can call
supplies are going down. they are going down because of the burdens and regulatory environments shutting down power plants. what we have to do is look at my energy plan. it is an all of the above approach. we have to ensure that we put more plants in action. more nuclear facilities so america continues to lead economically. if we put ourselves at an economic disadvantage because we are meeting emissions targets that are already doing better than most industrialized we hold let's make sure anybody else accountable in the world. start worrying about the american energy and american economy. the pipeline, that is thousands of jobs that can be created right now in america with a signature from president obama. that needs to happen. let's make sure we maximize our missions controls, we utilize natural gas, and we look at expanding our nuclear options here in this country. >> 30 seconds. >> renewals can take care of -- i do not claim renewable can take care of all our energies at this time. we need to take a big step forward. we find ourselves unable to when we have people beholden to oil and
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
an understanding of an environment -- if you come back to - 0, about focusing on the customer and producing products that our customers really want and value, it is an understanding in a sense of the economics, distribution, vehicles, the supply base. i talk about the 12,000 jobs at ford, the jobs in the supply base and related engineering activities. i really just keep coming back to the market itself, the opportunity to put great vehicles out there, to focus on the things people really want, and to talk back to the high- tech jobs. historically, our industry, particularly the domestic manufacturers in the detroit area -- for now, competitors of rust belt. we made a commitment to engineer the highest quality vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in every sector the we compete in every market around the world. if you come back to some of the investments i mentioned earlier, a very large percentage of those investments have been in very high-technology power trends, weather they are hybrid vehicles, battery, electronic vehicles. we now have six electrified the nichols we will be selling
capital needs, economic needs and needs for support in its environment, its region for a very long time. that has been the point of some of the things that are not to do with nato and not to do with me that have been going on over this year. so there has been an istanbul process in which regional countries got together, it was followed up be a kabul conference this summer, a series of regional confidence-building measures. those are now going with support from the international community. foreign secretary, for instance, was in kabul in the summer for the second of those conferences and promised support to that process where we can. there is the international aid picture, 4.1 billion promised to the ansf or pledged to the ansf up to 2017. there is also a further 16 billion, roughly the same amount per year, on civil development aid up til then. so there are a lot of other actors. i'm not going to speak on their behalf. it's not my job, and i could mislead you, but what i will say is that what is done by isaf and what is done by our armed forces are a smaller part of that longer-term pic
to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 273 (some duplicates have been removed)

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